Trace Your Native American Ancestry

Trace Your American Indian Ancestry

Many families have handed-down stories about American Indian ancestors. For a family historian, discovering the truth behind these tales and tracking down that elusive native forebear can be a challenging prospect. Learn how to Trace Your Native American ancestry with this free eBook download.

Learn how to trace your Native American heritage with several articles from Family Tree Magazine, gathered together all in one convenient e-book. Packed with tips and resources, you’ll discover ways to discern the truth from common myths, find your ancestor’s tribal ties, and more.

You don’t need to purchase anything, just type in your email and you’ll get instant access to the download.

Did You Know?

IndianTerritory

Indian Territory, which existed 1834 – 1907 in what is now Oklahoma, became the home of many tribes that removed from the Eastern United States. In 1907, lands that didn’t go to the 5 identified tribes were opened for settlement, which included the Freedmen, former slaves of the tribes who were, after the Civil War, considered tribal citizens.

Identifying only five tribes was incredibly short-sighted and did not even begin to include the various native tribes and communities that populated this land. As of 2016, according to the National Congress of American Indians, there are 566 Federally recognized tribes currently in the United States.


Trace Your Native American Ancestry contains:

Native Sons and Daughters
This handy guide will show you key resources for discovering your ancestor’s tribal ties.


Indian Territory
Explore the truths and myths of Native American heritage, and get great tips and strategies for tracking down your American Indian ancestor’s records.

Native American men on horses


Hawk Eyes
This article contains three tips for busting that Native American brick wall.


First Families
Our most recent article offers even more resources and strategies for finding your family history among America’s first residents.

American Indian Research Tip